#CitiTrends Episode 18: Cyber Security in Ghana vrs Lifeline of SMS in Ghana

Source: linkedin

Source: linkedin

I love weeks like this when the world is buzzing with technology stories.

The truth is, its like this every week.

Who is complaining?

This week on the show, we are all aware that around 40% of the world population has an internet connection today. Africa accounts for just 9.8% of this number. In recent months, the world has been over taken with countless stories of cyber breaches here and there. The hacking of the Sony Corporations, Kaspersky (which is an antivirus company) and US federal government are good examples. I sat with Albert Antwi-Bosiako who is the founder and principal consultant with e-crime bureau, Ghana’s first Cyber Security & Digital Forensics firm, and asked some questions about the state of cyber security in Ghana.

One woman who has been increasingly active in the SMS landscape in Ghana is Anne Amuzu, CEO of NandiMobile and I caught up with her and asked her what her thoughts were on the matter of the lifespan of SMS.

Awo shares four Apps this week; Any.do, Truemessenger, Feeday and TwinorNot on the Apps segment of the show. Mawuli Tsikata shares some technology news stories in the Trending segment of the show.

Press play and enjoy the show.

Switch on your pitching power

credit: tedconfblog

credit: tedconfblog

It is one thing to have a product. It is another thing having a functioning product.

However, the power of pitching your functioning product to the community your product is targeted at, can often be a whole new kettle of gold fish.

That is what i have found anyway.

A month ago, during a round table conversation with some of Accra’s tech minded individuals, i was informed that one of the biggest problems startups face has to do with exposure. It appears people do not know their story. Everyone is caught up with the hype of the few successful ones.

Despite my insistence that most app developers in Ghana i have come across are more interested in the ‘money side’ of the entrepreneurs journey, i was impressed upon to acknowledge the role the media played in shaping that mindset.

In a recent interview with Eric Kumah of NewAccra.com, and Patience Teiko Tetteh, software developer with E4 Solutions, i understood to some extent of the difficulties of app developers in Ghana.

The question that kept popping up was: Who was telling the ‘real stories’ of app developers and young entrepreneurs? How were Ghanaians going to know about applications made to solve their unique problems?

The #CitiTrends 2-Minute App Pitch was thus formed.

The idea is simple.

Ghanaian app developers have two minutes to pitch their applications to a listening public on award winning radio station Citi 97.3 FM. The pitches will be heard on #CitiTrends, a 30-minute technology focused radio show.

The pitches will cover :

1. Name and genesis of app

2. The problem the app seeks to solve in Ghana

3. How people can access the app

4. The future of the app

At the end of every month, one app developer will get an extended interview on #CitiTrends where they can expand on the details of their apps.

App developers can register their interest by sending an email to philipashon@citifmonline.com. 2-minute voice notes of pitches can also be sent via Whatsapp number: +233 505811759.

It is an exciting time in the technology space in Ghana and i can’t wait to see where this pitch challenge leads.

Get pitching!

#CitiTrends Episode Four: Social Media and Health vrs Ghanaian App Developers

Kobby Blay

Kobby Blay

Another great week of great stuff happening in the technology space in Ghana and #CitiTrends is keeping up with the beat.

The show features Kobby Blay, who likes to describe himself as ‘The hub of the latest information in Ghana’s healthcare industry’. He is the founder of Ghana Health Nest (GHN), an information and digital health innovations agency. He is also the Director for Health Care Social Media, Ghana – #HCSMgh. He speaks about the dynamics of social media and health care delivery in Ghana.

Eric Kumah of NewAccra.com, and Patience Teiko Tetteh, software developer with E4 Solutions, then share some thoughts on the current condition of app developers in the Ghana.

The show features two apps as well that focus on photography. There is ‘Enlight’ and Facetune for you to go try out.

Its a packed show. Enjoy

Contrasts and Comparisons

Making ends meet in Grahamstown is never easy, especially when it gets cold

I could almost see a tear in her eye as she spoke to me. The passion in her voice made it quiver and her constant slapping of her hands to emphasize a point didn’t help either. Her natural hair, her slim physique, her gestures and brown slippers gave nothing away of the strong views about how much she wanted to change her country.

I met her in the streets of Grahamstown while searching for food. She had two friends with her (I will come to them later) and I guess the talkative part off me took over immediately. It was her response when I shared a joke with the group that got me to ask my first question when we were seated in the lush sitting area at Hill Street manor.

She said “As South Africans, we think that the struggle is over. In terms of history, I think our history will always be relevant for today because it is informing the present. But at the same time I think that, especially with black people, I don’t think we have maintained an eye for the main chance. I think now we feel we are in a democracy now, we can go to school, now we are fine; I don’t think we are hungry.”

She is 21 years old. I did not know this at this point so pardon me. I just sat there and wondered to myself, “what an amazing mind”.

We were speaking about Grahamstown and Rhodes University and drawing parallels were there were some to be drawn and understanding why when she walked through the streets the people felt she belonged to another world.

She told me the people in the town, which is a street from the university, felt like the school was in a bubble. A sacred sanctuary for a privileged few who were very different from them.

Made me think about my city of Accra. A town, more metropolitan, more chic, with many lights than Grahamstown but with much the same contrasts. The poverty and rich living side by side, the literate and illiterate side by side, the filthy and clean side by side, the cheap and expensive… yes side by side.

Here words hit me: “I think it’s because we have forgotten what hunger feels like that we’ve become like this. That whole sense of entitlement.” Like someone owes us something. Like I have been living here for 20 years after my great grandfather lived here with his great great grandfather who acquired the property from his ancestors.

Anny (the only other guy who walked with us that afternoon) has said to me earlier that day, “South Africa will have been worse than Grahamstown if the black people had ruled South Africa”. Much like what I hear a lot of Ghanaians say a lot of time; “why did Nkrumah rush our independence”, “why did he have to say self-governance now?”

Nomonde Ndwalaza’s (that was her name) words explained it to a point “It’s important, the context, and it is important to understand why people see things the way they see them”. So why do we see things that way then? Why do we feel like we deserve something and yet never work to keep it or maintain it? We felt we deserved independence. We fought and bled for independence.

So what, now we don’t deserve good roads? We don’t deserve clean water? We deserve malaria and cholera to exchange batons in and out of season? We deserve over crowded city centers and deserted towns and villages where the production of the fuel for the powering of the nation happens?

A woman with a great mind worthy of exploring

Nomonde again “we need to keep trying and we need to be aware that intentions don’t translate into actions. We have a lot good intentions but at the end of everything we need to be doing stuff… We need to be moving because if we are not moving then there is no point. We are wasting money. It’s important that we say “what are we trying to achieve”, and at the end we look back and say “did we achieve it or not?”

Truth. Wish I could say it better but then, can i? When we leave the office knowing full well the script is poorly written. When we refuse to properly clean the fish the client will be coming in for at lunch time. When we throw the bag out of the window!

“Intentions don’t translate into actions”.

She went on “I think that we need to be critical of ourselves all the time. I feel like people find it hard to criticize each other. As people, do what you can when you can, don’t wait for people, don’t wait for that moment and don’t wait for yourself.”

I could have ended here but then I knew i won’t forgive myself so I asked her about her people and their government. I asked her because it seems everywhere the people blame the government for all their woes. The government this and the government that.

“Does the government of South Africa know its people?”

“I think the people think that the government knows them especially with voting patterns; I think people will rather vote for a black man rather than a white man. It’s more instinctive and intuitive more than it is rational”, she started off.

Then she said “I think our leaders are generally desensitized. They are leading from a distance. This thing of saying that I have to be poor to understand poverty, it’s very problematic…  The values that informed the struggle for freedom in South Africa are not shared anymore or they have been lost. Where they are living the good life and keeping everything to themselves and are not sharing anymore.”

She did not cry, but I did. Not there, of course not. But when I sat and wrote this piece. When I thought about how in Obuasi it was ok for the ‘white people’ to be on the hill while the ‘black people’ were at the bottom. How they had their break time 30 minutes before ours. How the swimming pool had to be cleaned out when the ‘black people’ had used it so the ‘white people’ could use it. How it always felt weird my ‘black friends’ gave me messages to pass on to my ‘white friends’.

It might have been amusing as a child, but now it just makes me cry.